What Do You See In Beer Magazines?

More accurately, what don’t you see?

Nudged by an unexpected and thought-provoking conversation earlier this year, I was moved to do what the caller suggested: taking a count of images of women and men in beer publications to point out the sex disparity.

We have a few beer magazines in our home so I got the pile and started counting.

Even I was surprised.

Here’s the yield of this sampling:

Female                       Male

All About Beer

March 2017                           21                               55

January 2017                        19                               50

Beer Advocate

#113                                       6                                  20

#118*                                     15                               23                        *Female STEM article

#120                                       9                                  54

Brewer

May/June 2016                    12                               41

Nov/Dec 2016                       6                                  29

Craft Beer & Brewing

Oct/Nov 2015                       9                                  46

Feb/March 2016                  7                                  40

April/May 2016                    5                                  57

The New Brewer

July/Aug 2016                        34                               167

Nov/Dec 2016                         20                               93

Jan/Feb 2017                           18                               78

Zymurgy

March/April 2016                   12                               48

July/Aug 2016                          8                                  36

Nov/Dec 2016                           18                               67

I sent a letter to the editors and publishers of these publications with these findings, in an educational fashion pointing out: “Note: This isn’t an attack – rather highlighting a fact you’ve created which we can change for the better.”

It’s not an attack; it’s an enlightenment, a helpful count to assist those in a position to change things for the better today to see what they are really putting forth.

Do I have an ax to grind? Not with the editors and publishers. Indeed, I count the ones I know as friends and colleagues, have even written for some of them. With beer overall, perhaps. A mystifying grind as it were. People throughout the industry, women and men alike, say they are all for equality and then accept sexism in all sorts of ways related to beer. It’s totally disconnected and assumes that no, they don’t all get it. Not by a long shot. And they must to survive and grow.

I did this with respect. Mostly to help grow the full respect for and of women. And with the intent that this will help them see, literally, the positive (and negative) impacts of being blind to what is really unfolding in front of our very eyes. It’s a situation all of them can change – today if they really want to make beer welcome everyone.

What, if anything, did I hear in reply?

Exactly one response; a phone call from the founder and publisher of Brewer Magazine. It was a positive and enjoyable call, a first contact with this person. They expressed their concern. So far nothing else has happened.

So does beer really care about females and including them equitably in the images and articles of the everyday magazines in the trade and on the stands? These numbers can lead you to your own conclusion. I say it doesn’t. If we don’t see it, we don’t believe it.

Why did I do this?

I focus on the Why (qualitative, psycho graphic – reasons to our decision making factors) and I wanted to see what exactly the numbers were; to communicate that the research I’ve conducted for 8 years does in fact show in data (insight) what the pages did in pictures.

Women Enjoying Beer exists to enlighten those in the beer world who see value in knowing what the most powerful beer buyer and drinker does and thinks. We’re the only firm on the globe holding this precious and useful information. It’s researched procured data that tells the full story, something that statistics and scan data can never do. Why Women Buy Beer. For the right company, what we offer is life & business changing for the better.

If you are one of the right people, I can help you significantly grow your business.

FYI: Licensed Data is now for sale to qualified clients. Call me to discuss. 515.450.7757 PST

*

Counts include all relatively easily discernible images, overtly female and male, photographs and illustrations, ads, articles, editorials.

Includes advertisers illustrations and art, since you can control what you accept and decline.

Crowd shots factored in depending on how easily gender of people in shots can be quickly determined.

If you count and have slightly different numbers, the point is still the same.

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April Book Offer With Bonuses

The book you need.

Do you agree that beer is for every body?

In homage to spring being a time of renewal and limitless possibilities, how about a goodie to jump-start us to progress?? I’ve got a limited number of books earmarked for this special – once they’re gone, they’re gone!

Here’s my offer to you today:

Buy your own copy of the book, How To Market Beer To Women, Don’t Sell Me A Pink Hammer this week (through Friday 4/14/17) and I’ll give you two Bonuses:

  • Bonus #1: Complementary 15 minute phone call consult on how to best use the book, good through May 15, 2017
  • Bonus #2: Complementary document, Yes! and No!: The Do’s & Don’ts of Marketing Beer To Women for you to utilize and improve your business, better reaching more possible beer friendly taste buds and eager beer brains.

Offer good ONLY THIS WEEK!!

Order now.

Once you’ve ordered your book, we’ll schedule your bonus consult and I’ll send you the Yes & No bonus resource so you can put it to immediate use.

The book is the only one of its kind: a guidebook to increase and improve the beer community, to the benefit of all. 

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Crafting A Community

Creating a community involves many facets of consideration. One of them being language and terminology.

One word the beer world uses is ‘craft’ – and I think it’s hamstringing those who use it. Here’s why.

Classic example: Having recently presented at the Nightclub & Bar Show, Las Vegas Nevada, I was paging through the program. Looking for who else I knew presenting, interesting topics to read up on, and making sure I had my info straight pre-talk. I did see a few familiar names (always fun) and new topics to investigate (good for the brain) and my info was straight.

What I also noticed was the page on their Craft Brew Pavilion. Here’s what I find odd.

  1. The Brewers Association has self-determinedly put forth their definition of what a craft brewer is, not what a craft beer is (they try to be very direct about this differentiation).
  2. The industry of ‘craft beer’ has embraced this delineation. I appreciate having guidelines and parameters in some areas of life (like when I’m driving), yet beer is for everyone – and the term ‘craft’ really has nothing to do with the consumer; everything to do with going to market and production considerations for brewers. Yes, some consumers want it yet all brands should be founded on their own merits to begin with, not relying on one word to make or break (that’d be foolishly shortsighted).
  3. The word craft is like the word Natural was in the 1970’s – at first it had some legitimacy; then everyone started using it thinking that consumers would flock to the products that advertised as much, however true or untrue the claims. And there was and still is (to my knowledge) a set global agreed upon by multiple bodies definition of the word. So why use it?
  4. If your beers are well-crafted, then use that in your marketing.
  5. I guarantee you that from my own data backed qualitative research the word ‘craft’ isn’t as relevant as the makers would want it or think it to be. Most consumers simply want products and goods they enjoy and can buy and share.
  6. The list of Companies in the NCB Craft Brew Pavilion wasn’t following the letter of the BA definition (which seems to be what most people go by – so is it moot to begin with?). They included: Black Tooth Brewing Company, Bootleggers Brewery, Boston Beer Company, Breckenridge Brewery, Dogfish Head Craft Brewery, Duval Moortgat, garage Brewing Co., Green Flash Brewing, Lagunitas Brewing Company, Odell Brewing Company, Pear Up, Squatters Craft Beers & Wasatch Brewery, The Dudes’ Brewing Company, Wild Tonic.
  • Are all of these actually brewed, first of all? Is tonic brewed?
  • What’s the technical definition of ‘brewing’?
  • Are all of these fitting to the limited definition of a craft-brewer? (no)
  • Who’s putting this list together and are they trying to get traction or simply inaccurately lumping vendors they could get signed on together?

How about a simple Beverage Pavilion for accuracy sake?

Accuracy is critical. If you’re going to do something, do it well and accurately. Seeing this list pokes holes in the idea that ‘craft’ is special. Most beer enthusiasts I know would be able to take a look at the list and tell me which companies in the line up don’t fit the aforementioned definition.

And really, who cares.

Call this area a Beverage Pavilion – by all means and for all vendors and visitors, that’d be accurate. To call it otherwise is inaccurate, a falsity that only perpetuates misinformation. Who’s to tell me – as a consumer – what is craft and what isn’t? We make our decisions on the moment we make them, with the immediate influencing factors already in place.

As a marketer it pains me to see any entity publish inaccuracies, especially in a very specific arena like this.

Marketing isn’t solely around to drive sales. Marketing is communication. And the world deserves and wants accuracy and transparency. Nothing chaps my youknowwhat more than marketers getting unjustly blamed for shenanigans others may have instigated and perpetuated. When you notice that info is wrong, speak up. Legitimate hard working marketers will appreciate the catch. At a minimum, a lively conversation will build bridges and new connections.

What’s craft? That’s up to each and everyone of us, our own definitions will work just fine. For the industry, it’s another story. Fine – use it in industry. But don’t mess with everyone else.

Well crafted products, owned by any entity and in any category, of any size volume, suits me fine.

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Change In Beer (And Everything)

“Change is gonna happen. Might as well give it a hug before it tackles you.” -M Sansone

Wise words.

How’s beer changed over the last year? Last five years? Ten? Thirty? Century?

A heck of a lot is the short answer.

And as beer drinkers and buyers, we can all embrace the good, and let the unsavory die on the vine.

I inquire with you today, fine reader, because Beer has changed. A lot. And it’ll continue to change, perhaps even at a more rapid pace than the last 30+ years, for the foreseeable future.

Change is always here and on the horizon

My stance is to ride the tide. Speaking with my wallet and the public platforms available to me to praise the positive, challenge the crap and in general participate in the conversation that develops and guides the foundation of every community.

When a beer brand you enjoy decides to sell for instance, stick with it for a while. Wait to see what changes (’cause something always will – it has changed ownership structure) before jumping any guns. Jumping guns is a dangerous, relatively permanent act too by the way. Rather ride it out, wait and see. Surprises can be wonderful as well as awful. Wait a bit then decide what you will do.

Change is coming. Or rather, it continues to come along. In beer, now more than ever in recent times. Enjoy it for what it is – a social beverage, bringing people together and creating common ground on which greater goods can be built.

Open your arms for a hug – here it comes!

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What Does Your Beer Taste Like?

“This beer tastes like ____.”

If that phrase has ever come out of your mouth, then it’s a good day to rethink letting it trickle out of your lips. We can all get smarter, quickly to get more out of our beer adventures.

What should that beer taste like? Itself, perhaps??

Let’s begin again:

  1. What does the reference beer taste like? What flavor, aroma and texture words can you expressly use to define it?
  2. What does the current beer taste like? What flavor, aroma and texture words can you expressly use to define it?

My beer did not taste like Zachary’s…

Do you go to an Irish pub, order the burger and say, “This tastes like McDonald’s?” I’ll bet you a beer that you don’t. Maybe because it doesn’t – and maybe because it does. Either way, they are entirely different experiences. Proprietors of all goods and services strive very hard to make their specific offerings to us singular to their brand, and therefore unlike any other business.

Can you imagine beer judges saying, “Well, this beer sure tastes a lot like the last one we tried. It must be the same.”

Indeed, I’d posit a guess that this is one very specific reason why the following quote is true.

“The chief business of the American people is business.” – C Coolidge.

Today’s an ideal day to begin getting specific; specific is terrific. Specificity helps you identify the beer and food you like, steer clear of those you don’t care for, and it also helps the makers – brewers included – help direct you to what they believe you’ll enjoy too based on what you can specify.

The next time you’re tempted to compare one beer to another, perhaps even with similar attributes and flavors, pause – get specific and continue. To each beer, its own description.

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Locals’ Blindness

Do you seek out local beer?

If so, why?

If no, why?

As of today, here’s what Dictionary.com informs:

local

[loh-kuh l]
adjective
1. pertaining to or characterized by place or position in space; spatial.
2. pertaining to, characteristic of, or restricted to a particular place or particular places:

a local custom.
3. pertaining to a city, town, or small district rather than an entire state or country:

local transportation.
4. stopping at most or all stations:

a local train.
5. pertaining to or affecting a particular part or particular parts, as of a physical system or organism:

a local disease.
6. Medicine/Medical. (of anesthesia or an anesthetic) affecting only a particular part or area of the body, without concomitant loss of consciousness, as distinguished from general anesthesia.
noun
7. a local train, bus, etc.
8. a newspaper item of local interest.
9. a local branch of a union, fraternity, etc.
10. a local anesthetic.
11. Often, locals.

  1. a local person or resident:
    primarily of interest to locals.
  2. a local athletic team:
    the locals versus the state champions.
12. stamp (def 22).
13. British Informal. a neighborhood pub.
verb (used without object)
14. Informal. to travel by or take a local train or the like.

 

Where does beer fit? And does a definition of local matter to you?

Local is, to me, more of a concept.

Snow: local
Wrangler: no local
Dog: local now

It’s about what’s close by, what’s been made or imported by a neighbor – do you support your ‘local’ coffee shop? Great – unless you live in a coffee growing area of the world, the beans sure as heck aren’t local. So why does that fit for you (if it does)? Local grocer? Local mechanic? Local bakery? Cheese maker? Tailor? HVAC tech? Same idea…they may live locally or be based in a locale close to you, yet the totality of their operations rarely stand on an island of local only.

As for beer, yes, you likely have a local brewery. The majority of the American population has one within 10 miles of their home.

Beer is made of 4 primary ingredients: water, grain, hops and yeast. So what kind of grain is in the beer you enjoy and where is it grown? How about the hops? The major hops growing regions of the country are few and far (literally) between; does that affect what beer you choose, if you aim for local? Yeast – well, some breweries harvest some of their yeast to re-pitch in subsequent batches. And when they need new yeast, where does it come from? Do you know where brewers get their yeast?

The term “locals’ blindness” is a new one to me and I thought it an intriguing concept. From what I gather, having locals’ blindness means you’re blind to what is outside your own definition of what is local (chime in if you can help me out here). When we think of beer, it would seem that some people shun their own locals’ blindness when a local brewery chooses to sell to another company.

Does that make it less local? I don’t think so. Does it change the business? Well of course it does; how could it not. Yet if it’s still in the same locale, it can still be local to many.

That’s why I think it’s a sticky, overused and oft-misused word.

I notice when local is used and, all the same, I don’t get too caught up in what is advertised as local; it’s always been a global economy. And as long as we use salt in our diet, drink coffee and tea, and want beer in our glass, we’ll participate in the agricultural and product-creating world at large.

Cheers to local, whatever it may be for you.

Here’s a good read as it relates to focusing your dietary intake on local.

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Lucky 13: Oregon Chocolate Festival Beer & Chocolate Menu

One of our fine team members getting the goods plated…

Mmmmmmmm

Ahhhhhhhhh

Ooooooooo!!

Robust crowd sounds abounded last weekend at the 13th annual Oregon Chocolate Festival, held at the Ashland Hills Hotel & Resort in Ashland Oregon. It was my 6th year presenting and they’ve come a loooooong way since they started. They’ve continued to see increased attendance, invite a variety of tasty and engaging vendors, host a line-up of educational presentations and have even added a run.

Six years ago when I started giving the classes, I literally didn’t know any chocolate makers. So – about twenty minutes before my talk, I ran around the festival floor, introducing myself and asking, “would you like me to feature your chocolates?” to a handful of vendors.

Great crew (slightly chocolate-goofy!) helping out

Dagoba was one of those vendors and they’ve become a long-term partner for me – and I’m so grateful and glad! World class organic chocolate, variety of flavors and styles (drinking chocolate powder, bars and so forth) and very easy to work with. Props to Jill and the Dagoba crew for their continued support. If you were there and liked the chocolates, be sure to let them know (they graciously give [read: donate] the goods each year).

This year was so much fun, as usual – because of the guests who come to partake of all the fest offers. And I’d like to give a special shout out to all the fine flavor lovers who attended one of my two Beer & Chocolate Classes! Thanks for everyone who came back and thanks to every one who experienced it for the first time.

My thanks as well to the fine volunteers from The Hospitality Club at Southern Oregon University, Asante, and the world class staff with the Neuman Hotel Group who makes sure everything is smooth and fabulous for me and our guests every year. To my captains, Katrina & Larry – you rocked it! Till next year ~

Love live the Festival!!

Here are the menus we enjoyed.

Saturday:

  • Standing Stone Brewing (all beers deliciously made by their brewer Larry Chase) Milk Chocolate Ale + Polenta with Dagoba Superberry + fresh blueberries & strawberries
  • Twin Plunge Double IPA + Dagoba Orange &  Lemonberry bars
  • Chocolate Porter + Ginger cookies with Dagoba Chai drinking chocolate & Xolcolatl chocolate chevre

Sunday:

  • Chocolate Porter + Dagoba Milk Chocolate bar
  • Twin Plunge + Lemonberry polenta & lemon zest
  • Milk Chocolate Ale + Ginger cookies with Dagoba Chai drinking chocolate & Authentic chocolate chevre

Recipes:

Chocolate Polenta

I made a large batch of polenta (to feed 100!) for each day. Essentially 12 cups of water + 4 cups of polenta; adding 2 bars of chocolate to each batch + 1 cup cream (not milk – it’ll separate). You can add more as desired – and I didn’t add any sugar at all, so the results were lovely and mild. Enhance and play with them as you wish.

Chocolate Chevre

Since I love love love goat cheeses, it was an easy pick to enhance chevre with the drinking chocolate powers. Allow the cheese to reach room temp and soften a bit more. When they’re room temp, sprinkle in the chocolate as desired. I highly recommend you add, mix & taste – following this pattern until you reach the flavor target desired.

Ginger cookies in testing mode

Ginger Cookies (on which we spread the chevre)

Yield = approximately 108 with a size 60 scoop dollops cut in half

Beat together until creamy: 1 + 1/8 c bacon fat* and 1.5 c sugar (mixing white and brown is a delight!)

Add: .25 c malt syrup or molasses + 2 large eggs

Sift together: 3 c flour, 1 t salt, 3 t baking soda, 1 heaping t powdered ginger, pinch cayenne, 1 heaping t cinnamon and .5 c Dagoba Drinking Chocolate powder of choice

Add dry ingredients to the wet, combine completely and don’t overbeat the batter.

Scoop or spoon out as desired. Note – with the bacon fat, they’ll spread so be conservative unless you want wide and flat cookies! Chilling the dough after mixed and before baking may help retard spread somewhat.

Bake at 350 for only 9 minutes; they can dry out and be really crumbly (if you like that style of cookie, go for it). Remove from the over after 9 minutes, cool for 1 minute, and remove to cooling racks. They cool and harden quickly too; store in airtight container. I surmise they’d freeze okay – and are always best fresh!

*I use Beeler’s 2# packages of bacon cuttings; it’s really low in salt and simple high quality bacon and a great value.

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Experimenting With Beer In Your Kitchen

Beer is an ingredient. So is Chocolate.

That’s how I sometimes view it – as a component, rather than limiting it to a glass for drinking. To limit is to cut off future opportunities and my taste buds don’t appreciate that!

Willing Dagoba chocolate volunteers, ready for duty!

So into the kitchen I’ll go this weekend to develop a menu and likely new recipes for the coming Oregon Chocolate Festival. While the sessions I lead would be successful with straight forward beer & chocolate, I’m more ambitious than that….preferring to come up with new ways to use tasty foods.

Come join us for the festival.

And if you run a food oriented event and are looking for a lively and crowd pleasing presenter, call me anytime. T’is always a pleasure to enlighten taste buds + brains with fun people.

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Free Marketing Workshops in DC April 10th

Need a boost for your marketing?

Join me for complementary marketing seminars Monday April 10th, immediately prior to the Craft Brewers Conference, Washington DC.

Details:

  1. Beer Marketing Seminar – graciously hosted at Gordon Biersch
  2. Two sessions to choose from: noon – 1 pm, 2 – 3 pm
  3. Material will include: 5 top reasons women drink and buy beer & Do’s and Don’ts in successfully marketing beer
  4. All questions answered as time allows
  5. Free to attend, $100 hold-your-seat/s deposit check required to hold your seat/s – you get it back upon arrival. To each their own tab at Gordon Biersch.
  6. Come for an hour packed full of insight into marketing beer, with the emphasis on earning and keeping more of the future market share of beer: women (they make 85% of all purchasing decisions, hold the largest opportunity for growth).
  7. My book will be available as well, to interested parties.
  8. All categories and ages of beer-focused companies welcome.

Do you want and need a beer marketing boost?

These sessions fill up fast (with waiting lists) so call me today to register (only international registrations will be taken via email). 515.450.7757 PST Call me to register and I’ll send along final details. Do not call Gordon Biersch to register.

Plus:

  1. I’m also co-presenting with Larry Chase at the CBC (Brewpub track, training), so you can come find me there as well.
  2. You can find me at the BA Bookstore doing a Book Signing Wednesday the 12th of April, 12 – 1 pm.

Cheers & thanks –

Ginger Johnson

Founder, Women Enjoying Beer

Marketer, Speaker (TED+), Author, Innovator

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Beer & Chocolate

It’s that time of year again – the Oregon Chocolate Festival is coming right up. And yours truly is again presenting lively & delicious chocolate and beer tasting sessions.

For the past 5 years (this year = 6th) it’s been a pleasure to be part of this event at the invite of my fine colleague, Karolina of the Neuman Hotel Group. As I look back at the previous years, I like what I see.

OCF 2012

2012: First year invited to the festival by Karolina. My Fine Husband is a brewer in the same town and he was invited to make a beer for and talk at the Friday night Chocolate Makers dinner. Yum! I was lucky enough to go along and enjoy the hospitality and get a glimpse of what was ahead. We also were given a booth in exchange for my presentation, wherein we sold WEB goodies.

It’s always fun to see returning guests like Michelle.

2013: On the grow – the festival keeps attracting return guests and new guests into the flavor fold. I’m invited back thanks to our success last year and it’s a great time again, this time with an even fuller room (2 sessions, one Sat & Sun) that last year. Returning guests provide a humbling bonus.

Felicia enjoys the festival, with a fresh beer in hand.

2014: Getting bigger! And our last year in the actual room inside the hotel. We’re bursting at the seams and I give away a few tickets to the event – even better to help the Hotel generate more enthusiasm for a consistently well run and well done event. Felicia is the Winner and I’m so glad to have her the other 40 – 50 guests for each session. The Hotel Group has a terrific team, year over year, too so that makes the life of a presenter so much easier and more fun.

2015: Last year at the Ashland Springs Hotel, Downtown Ashland. In the tent we had a ball with as many guests would fit on Saturday, as well as a robust audience on Sunday too. Still with chairs only, we can snugly fit 60ish guests seated, with a few standing in the back. Thankfully I had enough of everything to serve the groups. Even better, my filmmaker Sean and PR pro Erika are in the house to capture all this tasty fun (clip above).

Join us at the Hills for the Festival

2016: We made a big leap forward to the new location, Ashland Hills Hotel, where the room can seat significantly more. We set up for 80 (seats & tables) and had big overflow of likely 100 = 120! While it’s a thrill to get that many people in the room who want to take part, it’s a disappointment to not be able to fully serve everyone who wanted to be there.  Big thanks to my team, Stacy & Russ, for working with the NHG crew to make it sing for me and our fine guests. I also gave away some private beer & chocolate tasting sessions (only 1 of 3 was redeemed…).

Soon: March 3 – 5, 2017. We’ll seat 100 people only, making sure that those who get there in good time have a literal seat and chair to enjoy the fun. Saturday & Sunday will allow for two different sessions, separate menus and as likely a few surprises. I’m deep into the throes of menu planning and development – creating a fun and delicious & enlightening menu for the 100 guests we’ll have Saturday and the other 100 we’ll have Sunday. Plus Karolina has given me the opportunity to be the moderator of a panel of beverage & food specialists – can’t wait!

Paula, Cassie, Ginger & Karolina are ready for you to join the fun!

Why am I walking down this chocolate memory lane today? Because in a world of sometimes feeling like I didn’t accomplish anything some days, these events are incredibly tangible and real. They’re like my fairway: a successful event like this helps me keep moving forward, knowing what I do matters.

  • Thanks to all the guests – one timers, repeats and stalwarts.
  • Thank you to Karolina and my crews – you make it all the better and successful for everyone.
  • Thank you for my flavor partners, including Dagoba Organic Chocolate and Larry/Brewer and others.

I’m relishing the upcoming festival and hope to see you there. Here’s the agenda. Please, come join us.

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Love to Read? 3 Great Books Every Beer Pro Should Read

Think Like An Entrepreneur: 3 Books Beer Pros Need to Read in 2017

In our world where the sea of written work is growing exponentially by the day and our time grows ever more precious, how do you determine what’s worth your time?

For us it’s pretty simple: Do we enjoy it? Is there a useful lesson or applicable message in the pages? Are we recommending it forward?

Here are three books we recommend beer pros – and anyone in business – read now to improve their business.

  1. Creating Customer Evangelists, How Loyal Customers Become a Volunteer Sales Force by Jackie Huba and Ben McConnell. Huba and McConnell write that successful early phase businesses are paying attention to the early adopters of your products and services, which leads to buzz and sales. Their conversational style and case studies of who’s doing it right make this a fast read.
  1. Uncommon Service, How to Win by Putting Customers at the Core of Your Business by Frances Frei and Anne Morriss. If it were really common, then there wouldn’t be a need for this book. Service is fundamental to success from the very beginnings of business. Practicing the ideas from Uncommon Service starting Day 1 helps create great brands.
  1.            Read & apply.

    Drive, The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us by Daniel H. Pink. Motivation is a fascinating realm that Pink has dived into head first, gone to the bottom and then comes up to share his eye-opening findings of what moves people. The brief history of motivation and correlating eras is interesting and, more importantly, useful.

So What?

Plain old knowledge isn’t power: applied knowledge is. It’s up to you to do something with the knowledge you gain. And it’s as easy at 1-2-3.

  1. Use these books in personal and staff development: give, review together, apply the principles – readers are leaders.
  2. Give these books as rewards in your training and education programs.
  3. Develop an in-house, in-business library of hard copy books for check-out and development.

That’s what.

 

Valentine’s Day Bonus

Order the book, How To Market Beer To Women: Don’t Sell Me A Pink Hammer, today till midnight & receive a delicious bar of Dagoba Chocolate as a bonus with every book (yep, everyone you order). It’s our sweet little thank you.

 

The Fifty Percent is a project Using Data To Improve Our World by co-founders Meagen Anderson and Ginger Johnson. Syndicated data, consumer insight, consulting, speaking, writing.

Ginger: 515.450.7757 PST  g@thefiftypercent.com

Meagen: 972.821.6983 EST m@thefiftypercent.com

The Fifty Percent, On The House, V1 #1 Feb17

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