What Do You See In Beer Magazines?

More accurately, what don’t you see?

Nudged by an unexpected and thought-provoking conversation earlier this year, I was moved to do what the caller suggested: taking a count of images of women and men in beer publications to point out the sex disparity.

We have a few beer magazines in our home so I got the pile and started counting.

Even I was surprised.

Here’s the yield of this sampling:

Female                       Male

All About Beer

March 2017                           21                               55

January 2017                        19                               50

Beer Advocate

#113                                       6                                  20

#118*                                     15                               23                        *Female STEM article

#120                                       9                                  54

Brewer

May/June 2016                    12                               41

Nov/Dec 2016                       6                                  29

Craft Beer & Brewing

Oct/Nov 2015                       9                                  46

Feb/March 2016                  7                                  40

April/May 2016                    5                                  57

The New Brewer

July/Aug 2016                        34                               167

Nov/Dec 2016                         20                               93

Jan/Feb 2017                           18                               78

Zymurgy

March/April 2016                   12                               48

July/Aug 2016                          8                                  36

Nov/Dec 2016                           18                               67

I sent a letter to the editors and publishers of these publications with these findings, in an educational fashion pointing out: “Note: This isn’t an attack – rather highlighting a fact you’ve created which we can change for the better.”

It’s not an attack; it’s an enlightenment, a helpful count to assist those in a position to change things for the better today to see what they are really putting forth.

Do I have an ax to grind? Not with the editors and publishers. Indeed, I count the ones I know as friends and colleagues, have even written for some of them. With beer overall, perhaps. A mystifying grind as it were. People throughout the industry, women and men alike, say they are all for equality and then accept sexism in all sorts of ways related to beer. It’s totally disconnected and assumes that no, they don’t all get it. Not by a long shot. And they must to survive and grow.

I did this with respect. Mostly to help grow the full respect for and of women. And with the intent that this will help them see, literally, the positive (and negative) impacts of being blind to what is really unfolding in front of our very eyes. It’s a situation all of them can change – today if they really want to make beer welcome everyone.

What, if anything, did I hear in reply?

Exactly one response; a phone call from the founder and publisher of Brewer Magazine. It was a positive and enjoyable call, a first contact with this person. They expressed their concern. So far nothing else has happened.

So does beer really care about females and including them equitably in the images and articles of the everyday magazines in the trade and on the stands? These numbers can lead you to your own conclusion. I say it doesn’t. If we don’t see it, we don’t believe it.

Why did I do this?

I focus on the Why (qualitative, psycho graphic – reasons to our decision making factors) and I wanted to see what exactly the numbers were; to communicate that the research I’ve conducted for 8 years does in fact show in data (insight) what the pages did in pictures.

Women Enjoying Beer exists to enlighten those in the beer world who see value in knowing what the most powerful beer buyer and drinker does and thinks. We’re the only firm on the globe holding this precious and useful information. It’s researched procured data that tells the full story, something that statistics and scan data can never do. Why Women Buy Beer. For the right company, what we offer is life & business changing for the better.

If you are one of the right people, I can help you significantly grow your business.

FYI: Licensed Data is now for sale to qualified clients. Call me to discuss. 515.450.7757 PST

*

Counts include all relatively easily discernible images, overtly female and male, photographs and illustrations, ads, articles, editorials.

Includes advertisers illustrations and art, since you can control what you accept and decline.

Crowd shots factored in depending on how easily gender of people in shots can be quickly determined.

If you count and have slightly different numbers, the point is still the same.

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April Book Offer With Bonuses

The book you need.

Do you agree that beer is for every body?

In homage to spring being a time of renewal and limitless possibilities, how about a goodie to jump-start us to progress?? I’ve got a limited number of books earmarked for this special – once they’re gone, they’re gone!

Here’s my offer to you today:

Buy your own copy of the book, How To Market Beer To Women, Don’t Sell Me A Pink Hammer this week (through Friday 4/14/17) and I’ll give you two Bonuses:

  • Bonus #1: Complementary 15 minute phone call consult on how to best use the book, good through May 15, 2017
  • Bonus #2: Complementary document, Yes! and No!: The Do’s & Don’ts of Marketing Beer To Women for you to utilize and improve your business, better reaching more possible beer friendly taste buds and eager beer brains.

Offer good ONLY THIS WEEK!!

Order now.

Once you’ve ordered your book, we’ll schedule your bonus consult and I’ll send you the Yes & No bonus resource so you can put it to immediate use.

The book is the only one of its kind: a guidebook to increase and improve the beer community, to the benefit of all. 

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Crafting A Community

Creating a community involves many facets of consideration. One of them being language and terminology.

One word the beer world uses is ‘craft’ – and I think it’s hamstringing those who use it. Here’s why.

Classic example: Having recently presented at the Nightclub & Bar Show, Las Vegas Nevada, I was paging through the program. Looking for who else I knew presenting, interesting topics to read up on, and making sure I had my info straight pre-talk. I did see a few familiar names (always fun) and new topics to investigate (good for the brain) and my info was straight.

What I also noticed was the page on their Craft Brew Pavilion. Here’s what I find odd.

  1. The Brewers Association has self-determinedly put forth their definition of what a craft brewer is, not what a craft beer is (they try to be very direct about this differentiation).
  2. The industry of ‘craft beer’ has embraced this delineation. I appreciate having guidelines and parameters in some areas of life (like when I’m driving), yet beer is for everyone – and the term ‘craft’ really has nothing to do with the consumer; everything to do with going to market and production considerations for brewers. Yes, some consumers want it yet all brands should be founded on their own merits to begin with, not relying on one word to make or break (that’d be foolishly shortsighted).
  3. The word craft is like the word Natural was in the 1970’s – at first it had some legitimacy; then everyone started using it thinking that consumers would flock to the products that advertised as much, however true or untrue the claims. And there was and still is (to my knowledge) a set global agreed upon by multiple bodies definition of the word. So why use it?
  4. If your beers are well-crafted, then use that in your marketing.
  5. I guarantee you that from my own data backed qualitative research the word ‘craft’ isn’t as relevant as the makers would want it or think it to be. Most consumers simply want products and goods they enjoy and can buy and share.
  6. The list of Companies in the NCB Craft Brew Pavilion wasn’t following the letter of the BA definition (which seems to be what most people go by – so is it moot to begin with?). They included: Black Tooth Brewing Company, Bootleggers Brewery, Boston Beer Company, Breckenridge Brewery, Dogfish Head Craft Brewery, Duval Moortgat, garage Brewing Co., Green Flash Brewing, Lagunitas Brewing Company, Odell Brewing Company, Pear Up, Squatters Craft Beers & Wasatch Brewery, The Dudes’ Brewing Company, Wild Tonic.
  • Are all of these actually brewed, first of all? Is tonic brewed?
  • What’s the technical definition of ‘brewing’?
  • Are all of these fitting to the limited definition of a craft-brewer? (no)
  • Who’s putting this list together and are they trying to get traction or simply inaccurately lumping vendors they could get signed on together?

How about a simple Beverage Pavilion for accuracy sake?

Accuracy is critical. If you’re going to do something, do it well and accurately. Seeing this list pokes holes in the idea that ‘craft’ is special. Most beer enthusiasts I know would be able to take a look at the list and tell me which companies in the line up don’t fit the aforementioned definition.

And really, who cares.

Call this area a Beverage Pavilion – by all means and for all vendors and visitors, that’d be accurate. To call it otherwise is inaccurate, a falsity that only perpetuates misinformation. Who’s to tell me – as a consumer – what is craft and what isn’t? We make our decisions on the moment we make them, with the immediate influencing factors already in place.

As a marketer it pains me to see any entity publish inaccuracies, especially in a very specific arena like this.

Marketing isn’t solely around to drive sales. Marketing is communication. And the world deserves and wants accuracy and transparency. Nothing chaps my youknowwhat more than marketers getting unjustly blamed for shenanigans others may have instigated and perpetuated. When you notice that info is wrong, speak up. Legitimate hard working marketers will appreciate the catch. At a minimum, a lively conversation will build bridges and new connections.

What’s craft? That’s up to each and everyone of us, our own definitions will work just fine. For the industry, it’s another story. Fine – use it in industry. But don’t mess with everyone else.

Well crafted products, owned by any entity and in any category, of any size volume, suits me fine.

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Love to Read? 3 Great Books Every Beer Pro Should Read

Think Like An Entrepreneur: 3 Books Beer Pros Need to Read in 2017

In our world where the sea of written work is growing exponentially by the day and our time grows ever more precious, how do you determine what’s worth your time?

For us it’s pretty simple: Do we enjoy it? Is there a useful lesson or applicable message in the pages? Are we recommending it forward?

Here are three books we recommend beer pros – and anyone in business – read now to improve their business.

  1. Creating Customer Evangelists, How Loyal Customers Become a Volunteer Sales Force by Jackie Huba and Ben McConnell. Huba and McConnell write that successful early phase businesses are paying attention to the early adopters of your products and services, which leads to buzz and sales. Their conversational style and case studies of who’s doing it right make this a fast read.
  1. Uncommon Service, How to Win by Putting Customers at the Core of Your Business by Frances Frei and Anne Morriss. If it were really common, then there wouldn’t be a need for this book. Service is fundamental to success from the very beginnings of business. Practicing the ideas from Uncommon Service starting Day 1 helps create great brands.
  1.            Read & apply.

    Drive, The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us by Daniel H. Pink. Motivation is a fascinating realm that Pink has dived into head first, gone to the bottom and then comes up to share his eye-opening findings of what moves people. The brief history of motivation and correlating eras is interesting and, more importantly, useful.

So What?

Plain old knowledge isn’t power: applied knowledge is. It’s up to you to do something with the knowledge you gain. And it’s as easy at 1-2-3.

  1. Use these books in personal and staff development: give, review together, apply the principles – readers are leaders.
  2. Give these books as rewards in your training and education programs.
  3. Develop an in-house, in-business library of hard copy books for check-out and development.

That’s what.

 

Valentine’s Day Bonus

Order the book, How To Market Beer To Women: Don’t Sell Me A Pink Hammer, today till midnight & receive a delicious bar of Dagoba Chocolate as a bonus with every book (yep, everyone you order). It’s our sweet little thank you.

 

The Fifty Percent is a project Using Data To Improve Our World by co-founders Meagen Anderson and Ginger Johnson. Syndicated data, consumer insight, consulting, speaking, writing.

Ginger: 515.450.7757 PST  g@thefiftypercent.com

Meagen: 972.821.6983 EST m@thefiftypercent.com

The Fifty Percent, On The House, V1 #1 Feb17

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Michigan Brewers Guild Comment

Thank you for giving a great session*. I really enjoyed your entire lesson. The thing that stood out the most to me was your suggestion on how to get a better understanding of what flavors people like to transform them into a beer drinker. I never really thought about asking a wine drinker what flavors they like in their wine and use that as a gateway to beer. I have always tried to start with a blonde, amber, etc and work my way up, typically finding that wine drinkers usually tend to go with something more flavorful anyways. I’m excited to have the opportunity to try my new technique.

Megan Scheerhorn, Marketing Coordinator

Saugatuck Brewing Company

Douglas, MI

*Beer & Sex: Marketing Beer To Women, Michigan Brewers Guild Winter Conference, Kalamazoo MI January 2017

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There’s No Trick To The Question

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Trick & Treat – beer is the one to beat!

The tricks and treats this time of year are obvious ones:

  1. Women enjoy the treat of beer, as do many other people.
  2. The trick is making sure women are addressed as any beer buyer, drinker and enjoyer: via taste buds and brains.

This Halloween season enjoy the beer you like – enjoy it with people whose company you like – and enjoy in moderation.

How to market beer to women is no trick. It’s simply knowing your audience, potential market share and supporting population. That’s a treat we can all enjoy.

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How Will Mature Beer Markets Grow?

By addressing women.

Mature markets is a misnomer, first of all. They aren’t mature if the entire population isn’t equally invited into the conversation.

One of the goals of the Brewers Association, for example, is to figure out how to grow in mature markets. Markets keep evolving and advancing, receding and changing so growth is a relative term. So I’d ask: how do you want to grow? More importantly, how do you define growth? What are those components driving your definitions? How will the definition change going forward?

 

Growth isn’t only or always about volume or quantity. It can be myriad definitions, as it suits the parties involved. I laud businesses who focus on growth as stability, internal improvement which then radiates to external audiences. Growth that lessens environmental impact, improves the quality of life of those involved and gives to the community around the entity is smart. Growth that increases capacity or volume sheerly for “more” is misguided and doomed to bust, sooner or later. Balloon walls are only so forgiving.

I can guarantee that when beer invites women into the conversation, markets will evolve – they will grow in participation – they will advance with more voices, more education and more participation. Until then, well, good luck beer.

Market growth isn’t that difficult to figure out or to accomplish. For example:

  1. Do the images and picture you use equally feature women and men? if it’s lopsided, you can fix it right now. I’ve yet to see a beer magazine have an equal mix of women and men. Who will be the first one to rightly accurately represent the population??
  2. Do labels, beer names or brand names focus on the beer, and steer clear of anything sexual? If your beer can stand on its own, it deserves a place in the market. If you are relying on sexist images – of any sort – then get out of the way for the rest.
  3. Are you talking to everyone who approaches your beer with equal enthusiasm? If you reduce people to brains & tastebuds, vs. reproductive make up, then you’re doing it right.

Beer needs women more than women need beer. Heck, women – and men for that matter – don’t ‘need’ beer at all. Growth of beer is reliant on women and the sooner the professional beer industry community sees that, the better off we’ll all be. In fact, I’ll drink to that.

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The Book Week That Was

Thanks to everyone who came out the book events in Denver last week, during the Great American Beer Festival.

  • Kokopelli Beer Company got us off and running (and sipping) by hosting 2 events: the first for beer pros & media, talking about the book, what’s in it and how to use it. The second was a screening of my TED talk for everyone. Both groups were engaged, fun and participated actively.
  • A tour of the Denver Museum of Nature & Science by Dr. Nicole Garneau was a real treat. I’m a tour junkie and the behind the scenes is always the most interesting ‘exhibit’ around.
  • Ginger with TV Journalist, Heather Mills, FOX Denver

    Ginger with TV Journalist, Heather Mills, FOX Denver

    TV time with very fun & sharp Heather Mills, KDVR FOX Denver, provided a morning boost! Their whole team is very smooth, calm and professional. Here’s the clip.

  • Visit Denver then took credentialed media around on buses to 3 breweries in Denver. As is their style, they take good care of us as guests and the bonus of Ed Sealover as our guide sealed the deal.
  • Book signings at GABF itself were good – both Thursday and Friday nights. The opportunity to meet with and talk to people who know the book holds real (ROI style) value is always gratifying.
  • The big World Premier Book Launch party at Lannie’s Clocktower Cabaret, with my venerable crew Diane, Dave & Marty, was a success. Our partner in this event was Ska Brewing – pints up to them for ‘getting’ there’s something to this. T’was fun to have a crew of Ska peep present & participating.
  • img_5015Wrap it up by attending a Brewers Association Press Conference – super useful insight – and then a special session of Paired – beer & food pairing at the GABF – and you’ve got quite the week!
  • The cherry on top was a radio interview with Gary Valliere, American Craft Beer Radio, Saturday, as we eased on down the road home.
  • People met, reconnections with friends and colleagues, many conversations & a few beers, books discussed signed & sold. It’s all part and parcel to my world in the beer community.

What was your week like?

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