2014 Marketing Beer To Women Workshop: Invite

Immediately prior to GABF this fall, I’m giving another free workshop that specifically addresses marketing beer to the world’s largest and most influential population: Women.
Free Marketing Beer To Women Workshop, pre GABF

Free Marketing Beer To Women Workshop, pre GABF

Ready to step up your marketing to successfully address the primary buyers of all goods and services in America? Reserve your seat today. If you’ve been to my presentations before, you’ll know they are lively, full of immediately usable information, well worth your time and will help you increase your business. Ask those who attended the sold-out one pre-CBC this year if you wish….

With the continued growth of the industry and increased choices for the consumer, you need to know how to reach the most valuable buyer around: Women.
Women + Beer = Success. If the goal is 20% market share of small American Brewers by 2020, it’s time to look at the population that will support this growth: women. There’s still much to do to totally tap into the female beer buyer and consumer with full respect to their brains and taste buds. The 20/20 Vision would include seeing women in every phase and facet of your brand development.
The workshop is free and space is very limited. Serious people are invited to contact me directly (not Black Shirt Brewing) to save your seat. This event is for professionals in the industry: breweries, distributors, vendors, growers, suppliers, retailers, journalists…. everyone who has a vested interest in marketing to women correctly.
Details:
Wednesday October 1st, 2 – 4 pm.
Black Shirt Brewing, 3719 Walnut Street, Denver CO
FREE!
Beer: Thanks to The Neenan Company, all attendees will get a free fresh First Pint of Black Shirt beer.
Buy your own additional beer & food (to each, your own tab!) – there may be a delicious food truck available…
RSVP’s required, limited seating
Call Ginger to save your seat 515.450.7757 PST, week day daytime calls only, no emails
First reserve, first sat. We’ll create a wait list as necessary – and it’ll fill up fast.
Neenan JPG LogoThe workshop will include information from reports based on the 2012 Women + Beer Survey, immediately useful marketing beer to women insight, and there will be plenty of time to ask questions. Please be prompt.
Thank you. See you soon –

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Talk About Flavor, Not Style

Seems that beer enthusiasts are consumed with talking about beer styles. Is this one brewed to style? Is this one not? How about which style beer goes with which kind of food? Which styles do you like or not like?

ENOUGH, I say!!

Beer also does not like people with prejudice.

Beer also does not like people with prejudice.

If you want to educate about beer, you must start with flavors first. Talking about styles don’t matter one malted barley kernel unless you know about flavor first. Jumping to styles is a bad tact and one that is sadly all too common.

Try this instead:

1. First of all relax, make a conscious effort to not judge or argue. Make these conversations productive and enjoyable for everyone.

2. When talking with someone, anyone, about beer, start the conversation with “what kinds of flavors do you enjoy?” Make sure to qualify it by stating all flavors, not just beer flavors. The world will open up.

3. Ask a question and then listen. Try “what do you like about that flavor?” and let them talk. Stay silent, don’t argue.

4. Then start going back and forth in conversation, making sure it’s a diplomatic exchange, never judgmental. Enjoy yourself and plug-in to learn something new from the other person.

Talking about flavor opens up entirely new idea avenues for you and your guests. Your guests support the brand so always be listening. People want to talk to you about your brand, about what they think about your brand so be a diplomat and take it all in graciously. Very few people will maliciously attack a brand with a brand representative.

Talk about flavor. Leave style behind for now.

Eventually style will emerge as people grow and learn and it’s not critical to enjoying beer. What are critical are an open mind, open ears and grace.

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Let’s Talk About Your Brand

1. What do you make or what is your service?

2. Who is your target market?

3. Why do you think you want to attract more women?

4. What are your company and organization goals?

5. Why does your brand exist?

Talking about your brand openly with your colleagues and clients is critical to your success. The time to start the conversation is before you open the doors, before you make your first sale, before you hire anyone else.

Communication = brand development. Brand development = success or failure. Success or failure = dependent on customers. Customers = women. Women = brand enthusiasts you need. Brand enthusiasts needs and deserve sound communication. Sound communication = successful business. Now you’re getting somewhere.

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Women + Beer: Ask Lots of Questions

We’re curious beings, we humans. As with many species we watch, inquire, investigate and explore. Go with that impulse.

The number one person you should be talking with is your customer. In specific, if you’re in the beer business, talking to women customers, buyers and drinkers.

What are you talking to women about?

What are you talking to women about?

Here are 5 reasons why:

1. Women make up fully half the population. Include this powerful group of people in your brand conversations and marketing.

2. American women make between 75 – 85% of all purchasing decisions, across categories. You want them to buy? Then engage them. Visit Marti’s site for more affirmation. Faith’s work is insightful as well.

3. Women like to talk about their experiences. We’ve heard before a positive experience gets chatted about and a negative one spreads like wildfire. Go for the steady chatter pattern.

4. With all the talk about growing the beer business, I’ve yet to see brands really slap their forehead and exclaim “WOW! Why haven’t we thought about women before?!” Why indeed.

5. Beer needs women. Having equitable representation in the consumer pool as well as in the professional arena is critical to a better global equilibrium, better for societies as a whole, and again representational of the actual population.

Talk to your female customers about beer. Ask them open-ended questions, be mindful of their time, and thank them for their input. NEVER argue. Always educate.

Need help figuring this landscape out? Call us. As the industry leaders of women + beer, there’s much we can do together for your success, starting with her first.

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Who Holds The Power?

Who’s in charge of your business? I mean, who’s really making or breaking the mold, who’s shaking things up for progress, and who really gives a damn?

Is it you? Do you care about women as a marketshare? Does it bug you for people to talk about a human population as a “marketshare” or would you prefer something softer and fuzzier?

Females are half of the population on Planet Earth. If you think it’s important to know this, you’re right. If you don’t care, it’s time to start caring.

Sylvia gives a damn. Do you?

Sylvia gives a damn. Do you?

If you’re in the beer business, in any way, shape or form, you better care. Women make the majority of financial decisions in America. Do you care about that? If you’re involved in the manufacturer of boxes used in shipping beer, you better care. If you’re a grower of an agricultural component of beer, you’d better care. And if you make and market the beer, you absolutely better give a damn.

Why? Well, start by asking yourself this question: “How many females do I know that I care about?” All ages of females apply. How many can you think of? Three? Twenty? One hundred?

If you can honestly say you have at least one female to care about, guess what: you care.

Caring about females in our global human population makes really good sense. It’s good business too. Hopefully it’s part of how you think about the world at large. And it’s great politics. Since all businesses are political in some way, however quiet or loud, giving a damn about females is critical to business survival and success.

When you’re looking for reasons to care, I’d invite you cruise through our website. With 5.5+ years of content, we’ve covered a lot of ground in asking and gathering women’s’ opinions about beer, their relationship to it and all manner of qualitative psychographic insight on why women engage (or don’t) with beer.

For those of you who already give damn, I salute you! Contact me and ask how we can help your efforts increase in efficacy and meaningfully. For those who are slow to get on board, now’s the time. Call me for help.

Everyone needs assistance and needs insight that they don’t or cannot get themselves to be successful. As the saying goes, no person is an island. In the world of women and beer, WEB is that resource. We go well beyond beer too (other industries welcome to inquire).

Women will give a damn when you do.

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The Story

Part of the story has to be the data.” – Dan Wandel, Symphony IRI, CBC 2014

Yes, I’d agree. I respect and like Dan and fully enjoy talking to another pro who’s in research.

AND I’d add that the data has to be both qualitative and quantitative.

Here’s a simple graphic to help you along.

In order for numbers to make sense they need reasons. You need to Qualify the Quantities. If you simply only gather and know the Yes or No type, a strictly quantitative story, you’re missing a world of information. This does the end subject and organization wanting the full picture a disservice.

Make very sure you include qualitative psychographic market investigation on your work. It matters.

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How Not To Contact Someone [Heads Up: this is a long post]

Arrived in my email inbox, 5/29/14:

“I produce the show [XXXX] hosted by [XXX],… syndicated show celebrating the world of craft beer. And I’m writing to ask for your help.

As great as the show is (we’ve just been nominated for an [XYZ]), generating revenue to produce the series remains a struggle. We are committed to shooting season two and are trying to fund the shooting of one episode through Kickstarter. Which means we need to get the word out (and quickly, since we are on a 30 day Kickstarter deadline).

It would be a great help if you could please contribute (as little as a buck is ok) and pass the word along to anyone and everyone you know — through Facebook, blogs, email lists, websites, any way you can help us reach as many beer lovers as possible. Please direct everyone to our Kickstarter site via this web address:

[site link]

By doing this, you can be a big part of helping us continue to get the word out about the great craft beer community. And we appreciate the assistance very, very much.

Thanks,

[name unimportant for this post]
Executive Producer
[show name]
[contact information]

My Reply:

“Hello Dave –

I too have a radio program, BeerRadio, every week; here’s the link. Hope all is well, congrats on the nomination. If you’re interested in having me utilize my audience to assist you, that falls under advertising and we can talk about terms/rates/details. If this is what you are keen on, be back in touch.

Good luck with your endeavors.
Cheers –

Ginger”

Reply from contact:

“You are actually telling me that in the craft beer world, where brewers routinely help each other out, you want to charge me to mention my Kickstarter project?  And what’s your price? Will you tie your rates to ROI as measured by donations?”

Here’s then is my dissection and reply of this perfect example of What Not To Do. Before you get your nose out of joint, take a breath and read up. Take it, learn, and redirect:

Hello [name withheld] –

“You are actually telling me that in the craft beer world, where brewers routinely help each other out, you want to charge me to mention my Kickstarter project?”

What do you know about Women Enjoying Beer and me? Are you simply blanket asking any company seemingly related to beer or are you vetting those you’re soliciting? Clearly no vetting or previous relationship work was done. Do you know we’re not brewers? Do you know we’re educators, researchers, and marketing pros? If you do your homework, like you should before soliciting for support, you’d know this. Don’t get irked at me for your lack of preparedness.

What you’re telling me is that you have no intention to pay for professional services to help your effort be successful, is that right cause that’s what it sounds like.

What’s your audience,” you ask. That’s what you should be doing: homework on this one before you blindly ask people. I’d ask you – why did you choose to send this to me? Our audience is wide, varied, global, consumer to pro. What is attractive about our brand that you’re soliciting me? Why are you asking if you don’t know who is listening to us, who we are speaking to and what we can bring to the table?

So, yes, that’s what I’m telling you. Before you get offended by your own poor decisions, consider a few things.

1. You reached out to me, in essence asking me to use my channels of business to advertise your effort, an effort you hope to eventually make a living on. Why should I even respond to an email that is essentially a money ask with no return for my efforts? Do your expenses pay themselves? If no, then don’t ask for free work.

2. We get numerous requests and asks to advertise for people, like yourself. Respect those you contact enough to realize the equation has to have something in it for everyone. For some it may be the sheer “feel good” aspect; for others there are myriad reasons. Never assume I want to give just because we are related to the same business. That’s foolish and arrogant.

3. I assume you make a living, somehow. We’re in business to make a living as well. To ask me for free work is insulting and I doubt you’d do that to your grocer, plumber, or doctor.

4. We’ve yet to meet so you’re making assumptions that because we are simply within the same industry I will do something for free for you. While we certainly give a good deal back, relationships needs to be started, built and grown before an ask is made. It’s assumptive for you to think otherwise. This is, then, a cold call. I don’t care what industry or business or agency you’re with if you’ve not done your work ahead of time.

5. Don’t be offended. You asked me for something and I responded with how it works for us.

6. Why don’t you pitch it instead of asking. Craft a professional pitch, give me the outline, a website, a few reasons based on the research you’ve done on me BEFORE you ask; make the reasons a fit with what we do and are about.

7. Your urgency does not create my emergency. Smart marketing, whether you’re launching a Kickstarter or any kind of campaign, needs to rely on the long view, not the short panic.

8. “As little as a buck…” you’re kidding right?? That’s really bad asking and planning. Go big, again -give me a reasons, tell me the story and know something about me before you ask. You’ll get more that way. Building  project one dollar at a time is a really bad plan.

If you haven’t done your homework, I don’t have time to listen. Good grief! Have some respect.

“Will you tie your rates to ROI as measured by donations?” Of course not – why would you hire any advertiser and then hold them to the results; it’s your brainchild, it’s your decision process and goals – the results fall squarely on your shoulders, not those who you employ to assist.

Here’s some free business advice:

1. Relying on Kickstarter to develop a brand is a backwards tactic. You must build buzz for your brand first then get those who are already excited about it engaged. Tap into the folks who followed and applauded your first season; start with them, and ask them to help spread the word. A lot of people use crowd sourcing wrong.

2. You provide no website or links of information for the recipient to consider. I’m not talking about the kickstarter site – I’m talking about the show site. Where’s that information? You’re putting sex before the first kiss.

3. You didn’t even ask if I was interested in the project – you didn’t me tell me a story of why this may be engaging; you didn’t get my permission to solicit me. You made all sorts of assumptions only considering yourself first.

4. How much competition is there for Kickstarter attention? How and why does your project stand apart? Why should anyone engage and support it? And why are you assuming people in/related to the industry want to/have time to/ feel compelled to assist?
5. Did you try calling instead, making a personal voice connection? No? Why not, I’d ask? Calling, asking right off the bat if the person has time to talk, then perhaps approaching the subject AFTER you know who you’re calling and how they also benefit from your requests is a much better tact.
I wish you the best, truly. And recommend you put more business thought into this project before going forward. Thick skin, thinking outside yourself and shelf the emotion you have tied to the project and purpose. Stay enthusiastic and focus on the people you are asking first. Then renew your efforts. You’re welcome to be in touch when you’ve go ta few more things figured out.
You know what’s in it for you. Be prepared to tell me what’s in it for me.
Cheers –
Ginger

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Invitation

“We’re going to reach [people] by inviting them in, not by telling them we’re better than them.”                 – Fred Bueltmann, The Beervangelist, CBC 2014

Fred’s a wise man. I’m glad he’s a colleague and friend, cohort and fellow flavor lover.

He’s also right. Invitations to discuss, explore, consider, and converse will always be more productive and successful than being exclusive, judgmental, and limited in our thinking.

Beer

Beer

American “craft” brewers are aiming to get to 20% market share by the year 2020. I’m all for smart thoughtful growth and wish them well. I’ll do my part to enjoy, share, and spread the word. I’d caution them all to invite, not judge or exclude. Some of them are very open-armed, some of them are very blindered in their thinking.

Craft is a word used in the industry, by the industry, not necessarily by the everyday consumer. Really: take a look at “craft” share – it’s in the single digits and definitely growing. To assume people everywhere are aware and share the same basis for any definition is dangerous. It harkens back to the 1970’s when the word “Natural” took over the grocery stores. There was no nationally recognized meaning, no factual base of governing body to set down parameters. It’s too broad of a word. I think craft is one of those words as well.

For instance: If you choose to market a beer as a craft beer, who are you targeting? Other industry folks? A specific market/s wherein there are people who share your same definition? People who have their own definition? People who simply want to think of beer as beer?

When consumers use the word there are varying degrees of understanding what they think craft means. It’s very contextual for everyone. Well crafted: I can get behind that. Size of business to me never gets ahead of quality. If a beer is considered craft by this definition, and their quality is poor, then there’s no craftspersonship to that. It’s slop, careless and not dedicated nor helpful to the entire industry, never mind the end consumer.

Use titles and labels IF AND ONLY IFF they are universal and factual. Ask: “What does [any word/phrase] mean?” If everyone answers the same way, there’s most likely good reason to use it. If not, reconsider. Reconsideration will open new ways of thinking and invite more people into the conversation and encourage participation. That’s the whole idea here.

I often find that professional events leave out the crucial person in all discussions: The Consumer. After all, they are the ones who will buy and support any business. Please include consumer considerations in all business equations. Consumers and customers are both internal and external.

If you invite people in, to enjoy well crafted goods, then kudos. Well crafted serves everyone.

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You Are What You Wear

What do you wear?

I’m guessing it depends on what’s going on. As in, are you going to do yard work or homework? Are you going to cook or go running? Is there a funeral to attend or a meeting at a coffee shop?

If you are what you wear, what are you?  If you are what you wear, then, what do you wear? How is what you wear who you are?

Sometimes the items in my closet stare me down. Hmmm….I find myself wondering…hmmmm…what will go out and about with me today? Or – what will stay in at with me at the office today? Or – what will hit the traveling mode with me today?

The ensuing responses to qualifying and deciding what to wear isn’t a matter so much of vanity for me. Of course I want to feel good in what I wear, though I’m not a vain person. What we look like does matter though to the world at large. Our immediate reaction, so thoughtfully and thoroughly examined in Malcolm’s book, is a matter of being human.

Like it or not, we judge viscerally on appearance. So if I’m in the business of business, then I must be thoughtful and aware of what I wear. If I’m a student I should be aware of what I wear.

I’d agree with this author – It’s astounding how little some people seem to care about their appearance. We’re not talking about being totally trendy or up to date. We’re talking being sloppy, careless, and with no cognizance of who might they positively or negatively impress – and just where they may cross paths again (work anyone? school? date? grocery store?). Cool isn’t slop. Cool is style and thoughtfulness and respect.

Julia, BA, always looks professional and approachable

Julia, BA, always looks professional and approachable

The same goes for the beer business. It’s really disconcerting to see so much over the edge casual, so much garb that’s seemingly unsafe (shorts in the brew house), and so much that says “I don’t care, this is all about me.” I’m most impressed by beer people who give damn about how they look. Distributors are pretty darn good about looking professional, whether at a conference or casually out and about. Breweries are all over the map with some looking like hobos and some looking like pros.

When in doubt, dress like a pro. It isn’t about being stuffy or formal; it’s about respect for yourself and the profession.

Being clean and tidy, even with tired or worn or out of date clothing, will always make more of a positive impression to me than someone wearing flip-flops and baggy pajama pants in the airport. Someone wearing a glib tee-shirt, perhaps tattered or with an off-color slogan or image. Pants that fall below the waist should be illegal too.

Airports and festivals are fascinating places to see what people are by what they wear. Sometimes you see the same person on different days wearing entirely different sorts of garb. It makes me wonder why. There are no doubt lots of interesting conversations to be had, done appropriately with people about what they wear.

I bet you’d find out pretty quickly who they are.

No matter what you do in life as we know it, have some respect for the others around you to give a darn. Put some forethought into what you put on. If you are what you wear, then be a good example of yourself.

Thinking about how you look to yourself and to others is important, however much we want to believe in individual expression. Go ahead – please dress how you like. Simply know that others are also individually free to look and decide what and who you are based on what they see.

Now, where are those Nocona’s…..I think I’ll wear them today.

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The Fable of Good, Better, Best

“Good, better, best, never let it rest. Until your good is better, your better’s best.” – Dr. Fagerberg, prof, CCMM

Once upon a time, there were three friends: Good, Better and Best.

They had met early in their lives and did a lot of things together. Hung out at the park, where there was really old original play equipment, newer gear and some sparkling new features. They’d go to the library where they’d see really old books, 20th century works, and then very current publications. They especially liked eavesdropping on conversations because they learned so much about what people thought.

Regardless of what they all thought individually, they all got along well and lived peaceably together in the same neighborhood. They knew that while they didn’t always share the same opinions, they wanted to get along and respect each other and keep their minds open to new ideas. Their elders and other close friends had taught them the value of diplomacy and respect.

One day the three friends were indeed listening in on a conversation. It was a table of 3 People in a brewpub and they were talking about beer (of all things!)

  • Person 1: “I love this beer! It’s so delicious.”
  • Person 2: “Are you kidding?! It’s rank and smells like barnyard and wet hay. Ick! I don’t know how you can stand it.”
  • Person 3: “Really?! I think it’s fine, and perhaps it’s supposed to taste that way. Did either of you check into it or ask our server about it first?”
Good, Better, Best

Good, Better, Best

And so it went, the conversation of the 3 People – around and around, back and forth, never agreeing on the beer in their glasses.

The three friends (Good, Better, Best) found this confusing and confounding. They wondered why the supposed three friends at the table were arguing so, not understanding that they can all simply taste, enjoy a and talk about it AND still value and respect each other fully.

They stayed a little while and eventually the 3 People paid their bill and left the pub, still squabbling over very minor things.

The 3 friends were quiet for a little while after the People left. “I wonder why they just didn’t let each other fully enjoy what they wanted to, instead of bickering and making the others feel bad or wrong…makes no sense to me,” said Better.

“Me either,” stated Good. Best agreed with them both.

They left that day feeling a little more sadly enlightened that some people want to always be Right, to be the Loudest Voice In The Room (making them Right) and wouldn’t graciously accept and encourage their friends to simply enjoy what they wanted without putting it down.

They decided that they’d always stay open to what the others wanted to try and enjoy. After all, everyone has their own taste buds, experiences and opinions. Good friendships are built on variety of and respect, they told each other. They knew they’d learn more and have more fun too if they all treated each other well and were kind.

Then they went along their merry way.

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What Keeps Me Up At Night

What keeps a person up at night is assuredly varied. Events in our lives, things we’re thinking about, and experience we may anticipate.

It's thoughtless things like this sign that hold everyone back. (p.s. on a road in Ashland OR)

It’s thoughtless things like this sign that hold everyone back. (p.s. ..on a road in Ashland OR)

All of those factor into my thinking. And they do in fact keep me up at night, as well as wake me up in the morning.

Here are a few things that disrupt my slumber:

1. With almost 3000 breweries operating in America today, why are so few of the owners and founders of these companies are seriously addressing women as viable and valuable market participants? They pass them by with exclusion in developing poor label name and design selection, sexist images, and base humor that insults everyone.

2. The relatively small pool of apparently enlightened businesses (beer and beyond) who want to truly address women and females as equitable planet occupants.

3. That fact that way too many women perpetuate sexist labels amongst themselves, giving the okay to use titles and words that denigrate the greater good. It’s absolutely not okay – it’s backwards; it’s not clever or fun – it’s damning.

4. In a good way: when we work with clients who really give a damn. Who are business focused AND have their eye on equity. Thank you.

Feminism, as a reminder is: the belief that women and men should have equal rights and opportunity. We should all believe that.

Here’s a thoughtful read and good book for examining modern women by Debora Spar.

What keeps me up at night, what wakes me in the morning, and what gets my blood rolling is the fact that women are still behind gender wise. Some women and men are great at creating positive change. Some of them stink at it.

There are no acceptable reasons for gender inequity in this day and age. None. Everyone needs to speak up, change directions, and make progress happen.

What keeps you up at night?

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Women Enjoying Beer Research Report Breaks Myths Why Women Drink Beer Revealed

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Ashland, Oregon, USA – 2 April 2014

Women Enjoying Beer (WEB) has released the first of several reports on women and beer, Report #1: Why Do You Drink Beer?, reveals 30-plus reasons why women consumers enjoy beer. This first report along with several more to come are based on the 2012 Women + Beer Survey initiated in January 2012 on the company’s website.

Ginger Johnson, company founder and lead researcher, knew plenty of quantitative data existed about beer drinkers. “The question I wanted to answer is of the women who drink beer, why do they? If we can learn this valuable information then the beer industry would have a solid tool to grow their market share with women. It’s an opportunity,” stated Johnson.

As the only business focusing on qualitative research around women and their relationship with beer, WEB is positioned to serve the female consumer and buyer and also help the beer industry correctly address the world’s largest consumer population: women.

Help comes with this first report. A few gleanings include considerations of affordability, food, economics and relationship factors as they relate to women buying and drinking beer. The largest category receiving input was Flavor followed closely by Variety from women across the United States.

Brewers, distributors, and on and off-premise retailers should all have an interest in learning how to best market beer to women. To maintain and grow beer market share within the beverage alcohol industry women are a key market. Not only do women make 75 – 80% of purchases across all categories, they are a large untapped market. With only 20-30% of women who drink alcohol drinking beer, the industry has a lot of opportunity. Since all beer related businesses succeed by knowing their target markets this report stands to greatly assist all facets of the beer industry improve marketing and selling practices by considering the end female consumer and buyer first.

“These reports are a long time in the making and the first one is ready for proactive businesses to utilize in helping their business grow,” states Johnson.

More reports from the 2012 Women + Beer Survey will be forthcoming throughout 2014.

####

Women Enjoying Beer
1271 Munson Drive, Ashland OR USA 97520
WomenEnjoyingBeer.com

Ginger Johnson, Founder
1.515.450.7757
Ginger@womenenoyingbeer.com
Twitter: @WomenEnjoyBeer
Facebook: Women Enjoying Beer

This press release will be available soon online. Other media information can be found at WomenEnjoyingBeer.com

Women Enjoying Beer (WEB) is the only global business that researches, develops and serves the female beer consumer.  WEB works with the beer industry to help it grow by authentically and accurately marketing to the female beer enthusiast based on qualitative research and education.  WEB also works with women and men directly to encourage their beer education through events, marketing, focus groups, and workshops.  For more information about Women Enjoying Beer and its focus on a ripe opportunity, please visit WomenEnjoyingBeer.com

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Opportunity Is Only Opportunity If You Want It

What opportunity do you see and pursue?

What opportunity do you see and pursue?

Opportunity is only present if you want it and take advantage of it.

As the CEO of my own company, I often hear myself say (in my head or aloud) “Opportunity is everywhere.” If you’re seeking it, if you’re willing to work to make it happen, if all the elements of success line up.

Opportunity is, then as well, passing up that project, job, volunteer position, or other activity that requires time and attention that does not fit with your goals and aspirations.

To say you miss an opportunity is a misnomer. Opportunity is not chance. It’s intentional. Being able to take part of an opportunity equates to paying attention to the right shiny objects, developing relationships intentionally, and making a dedicated commitment o to a goal. Opportunity is participation, not passivity. Make it happen, don’t wait for it to come knocking.

Opportunity in the beer world is for beer businesses to recognize women as full participants. They’re looking for opportunity that fits for them to participate in the global beer scene. Companies that see this and pursue it will reap rewards.

So I will always believe opportunity is everywhere. No doubt about it. The right opportunity is what to work on, not the wrong one.

Here are a few interesting reads related to Opportunity:

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When’s the Right Time To Hire WEB for Your Business

This is an excerpt from a recent email conversation. The context is this person wanted to attend our Marketing Beer To Women workshop

“In regards to a one-on-one [marketing consultation], I’ll kindly decline. We haven’t brewed our first beer yet and don’t think its the correct time to hire you.

I was interested on your talk because it is innovative and something to think off further down the road.”
The right time to develop your marketing plan, for all businesses and organizations that want o be successful, is early. To wait is to fail in best bringing your products, goods, services, and ideas to market.
I’d ask: What precisely are you waiting for? It’s never too early, and often it’s too late.
Once the doors open, it’s too late. Did you wait to call the plumber until you actually got the equipment in? Did you wait to contact the press until your doors were/are actually open? Did you wait to hire an architect until you had building materials delivered? Do you wait to order grain until the day you actually want to brew?
Plan ahead. Have success.

Plan ahead. Have success.

No to all of the above. Waiting in business is suicide.

I pity the foolish business person who waits to develop a proper marketing plan. Even more so, I pity the fool who waits to plan to market to women according to what the business is planning to sell.
I don’t pity the fool who’s too myopic or foolish to not consider women as a huge global force to reckon with. I agree with Seth.

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Grizzly Peak Winery & Beer

Sunday inaugurated a brand new idea to a local winery: Beer & Wine tasting, together. The open-minded and community oriented owners, Virginia and Al of Grizzly Peak Winery, were gracious hosts of this first time effort. They’re taking their time to build the winery slowly and

delicious Grizzly Peak Wines waiting to be tasted...

delicious Grizzly Peak Wines waiting to be tasted…

steadily with great results.

It’s a lovely location that exhibits a lot of love, hard work and investment. What a perfect place to hold a tasting event. It’s a place many consider for other events, as they’ve hosted plays, weddings and all kinds of other happenings.

With much success, the room filled with over 20 guests, 2 hosts and a few other special people to enjoy a sunshine filled afternoon learning about beer and wine together. The cheese and chocolate that accompanied the tasting was a flavorful and impactful addition as well.

Why beer and wine? Because you don’t have to only like one. You don’t have to choose one over the other. They are both eagerly awaiting the opportunity to give your senses a terrific experience.

The first time I gave a beer and wine event it was also at another winery. It’s yet another reason we need to shatter the idea that one beverage is the elite, the only, the one that strangely earns the self-imposed and very unsavory title of snob. And really it doesn’t surprise me since the wine folk I know embrace beer. After all it takes wonderful beer to make tasty wine!

Ginger & Virginia - happy tasters!

Ginger & Virginia – happy tasters!

Flavor is where you find it. The exploration of various liquids and solids can be enjoyable for all if the mind is open before the lips even part.

Menu: Beer & Wine, Together Forever

Cheeses featured were from Cypress Grove Chevre: Midnight Moon and Bermuda Triangle

Chocolates featured were from Dagoba: Hazelnut, Lemon Ginger, Beaucoup Berries, New Moon

I invite you to taste the two categories side by side – chocolate and cheese in the mix only teaches us more varieties of what’s possible for our palate.

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Marketing Beer To Women Workshop

WEB is offering a rare free workshop to professionals: Marketing Beer To Women.

Tuesday 8 April 2014, Denver Colorado USA.
See full details here.
Registrations must be made in advance.
Call Ginger at 515.450.7757 PST to save your seat. No email RSVP’s, only phone calls.

photo bu Judy Pavlik

photo bu Judy Pavlik

Ready to step up your marketing to successfully address the primary buyers of all goods and services in America? Reserve your seat today. If you’ve been to my presentations before, you’ll know they are lively, full of immediately usable information, well worth your time and will help you increase your business.

With the continued growth of the industry and increased choices for the consumer, you need to know how to reach the most valuable buyer around: Women.

Is there a problem selling beer to women? There will be if the continued trajectory of brewery openings maintains. The men that already drink beer will get stretched further and further – it’s time to look at new populations to support this growth. There’s still much to do to totally tap into the female beer buyer and consumer.

The workshop is free and space is very limited. Serious people are invited to contact me directly (not Cheeky Monk) to save your seat. This event is for professionals in the industry: breweries, distributors, vendors, growers, suppliers, retailers…. every one who has a vested interest in marketing to women correctly.

Details:

  • Tuesday April 8th, 2 – 4 pm.
  • The Cheeky Monk, 534 Colfax, Denver CO
  • FREE, buy your own beer & food (to each, your own tab!)
  • RSVP’s required, limited seating
  • Call Ginger to save your seat 515.450.7757 PST, daytime calls only, no emails
  • First reserve, first sat; we’ll create a wait list as necessary – and it’s filling up fast.

The workshop will include the newly available reports based on the 2012 Women + Beer Survey, basic Do’s and Don’ts in marketing to women, and there will be plenty of time to ask questions. Please be prompt.

NOTE: This is going to be full. A fully refundable deposit is necessary to complete registrations. Be in touch to make arrangements after you’ve read the link please.

One comment

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Report #1, Women + Beer Survey now available

We’ve completed the first of a series of Women + Beer reports based on our 2012 Survey. With 240+ respondents from all over the country, this first report is now available for purchase by professionals who want singular insight into how women make decisions around their relationship with beer.

Report #1: Why Do You Drink Beer?
With 34 separately apparent categories, each category within this report has a short explanation. Here is the link to the original Survey and questions.
Since all data requires interpretation to be fully useful and applicable, the purchase of this inaugural report comes with an included one hour discussion.
It’s critical you read the report you’re buying, formulate questions and then ask WEB how we can help you specifically interpret the report to fit your business and specialty.

Pricing:
Report #1 + One-on-One Consultation (1 hour) for previous and existing clients: $500
Report #1 + One-on-One Consultation for future clients and all other interested parties: $750

To Do:
Call Ginger during daytime hours at 515.450.7757 PST to purchase with Credit/Debit Card* and arrange the included One-on-One discussion date and time. It’s best to do it when the information is the freshest so we can help you the most.

    *Checks and cash also gladly accepted; the report will be sent to you electronically following receipt of payment.

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Marketing Beer To Women Workshop Invite

Immediately prior to Craft Brewers Conference in Denver this year, I’m giving a free workshop that specifically addresses marketing beer to the world’s largest and most influential population: Women.

Ready to step up your marketing to successfully address the primary buyers of all goods and services in America? Reserve your seat today. If you’ve been to my presentations before, you’ll know they are lively, full of immediately usable information, well worth your time and will help you increase your business.

Save your seat today by calling WEB

Save your seat today by calling WEB

With the continued growth of the industry and increased choices for the consumer, you need to know how to reach the most valuable buyer around: Women.

Is there a problem selling beer to women? There will be if the continued trajectory of brewery openings maintains. The men that already drink beer will get stretched further and further – it’s time to look at new populations to support this growth. There’s still much to do to totally tap into the female beer buyer and consumer.

The workshop is free and space is very limited. Serious people are invited to contact me directly (not Cheeky Monk) to save your seat. This event is for professionals in the industry: breweries, distributors, vendors, growers, suppliers, retailers….everyone who has a vested interest in marketing to women correctly.

A few seats are being reserved for interested qualified media & press as well.

Details:

  • Tuesday April 8th, 2 – 4 pm.
  • The Cheeky Monk, 534 Colfax, Denver CO
  • FREE, buy your own beer & food (to each, your own tab!)
  • RSVP’s required, limited seating
  • Call Ginger to save your seat 515.450.7757 PST, daytime calls only, no emails
  • First reserve, first sat; we’ll create a wait list as necessary – and it’s filling up fast.

The workshop will include information from the newly available report/s based on the 2012 Women + Beer Survey, basic Do’s and Don’ts in marketing to women, and there will be plenty of time to ask questions. Please be prompt.

Thank you. See you soon –

One comment

One comment »

International Women’s Day 2014

Saturday, March 8th is International Women’s Day. What does that precisely mean? And why do we feel we have a need to recognize women?

Here are 10 good reasons.

1. Females make up over half of the population. From those who enjoy Your Home to those who are as far-flung as our imaginations can carry us, and everywhere in between.

2. Women have always been brewers (see, I stayed on topic). Brewing is cooking, and women have always been actively engaged in the food arena in life.

Celebrate women: International Women's Day 3.8.14

Celebrate women: International Women’s Day 3.8.14

3. In a great majority of countries women are still second-class citizens and that’s fundamentally wrong. No one gender of person has more or less value than another.

4. Women in America are still paid, on average, 23% less than male counterparts.

5. Women are capable of everything and able to do anything.

6. Women are the reason we’re around. Yes it takes two to reproduce and women bear the majority of that task.

7. There are certainly celebrated women the world over, yet not enough.

8. There are scores of underappreciated and even recognized women and females the world over, wherein “any” is too many.

9. Women keep changing the world for the better.

10. It’s a proven fact via myriad research that societies with a mindful equity respect for women and men are so much more productive, healthy, and happy populations.

Notice I use the word equity instead of equality. (Mirriam-Webster) Nature has a way of equalizing things, yet we’re not in charge here. Humans should aim for equity instead of equality.

I look forward to the days where gender is a non-issue. Alas! It still is and talking about it and acting to change it will be the way to remove the inequitable in our world. It’ll never be the impossible perfect, yet it can be a whole world of good better.

So today’s the day (as is every day) to recognize, thank, and appreciate women. Skip the chocolates, massages, and other tired pithy nonsense and say THANK YOU. Ask her what you can do for her that holds real meaning and purpose. Do something that really matters. It may make you slightly uncomfortable and that’s how progress is made.

I thank you for reading. And I’ll thank you more for acting for women the globe over.

Till the next glass –

g

Go Here: Time is one of the most valuable gifts we can give. Volunteer with an organization that truly works towards female equity. A quick Internet search will yield countless opportunities to help, from the Girl Scouts to human trafficking.

Try This: Give the gift of your time to a female you don’t know: Visit an elder care facility and talk with the women you meet (residents and staff), walk some dogs at the shelter (equal opportunity here), and anonymously donate a few dollars to a female focused charity.

This column was originally published on Your Home with Karie Engels.

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Remarkable Marketing

I find this to be a head scratcher:

MillerCoors Makes Manly Pitch With New Hard Cider Brand” – watch the ad courtesy, Ad Age.

The article states:

“Hard cider is one of the hottest sectors in the alcohol business, but MillerCoors thinks the category is still missing some testosterone….Smith & Forge is going after the common man. MillerCoors sees opportunity in the fact that cider purchases skew far less male than beer.”

In the world of quality I think MillerCoors is world-class. Flavor is different from preference so remove any bias based on your own preferences. Why not focus on flavor instead of gender? Why not make an equally female savvy ad (if you can call the ad savvy…it is clever and fun) for the same product, delivering equal time to the worlds most oft-forgotten beer and cider drinkers: women.

Aside of this, the piece, which is *almost* non-gender oriented, stills screams ” Beer Is For Men, Cider Is Not.” Enter: Gender. WTH.

Time to blow the lid of gender, beer & cider

Time to blow the lid of gender, beer & cider

Who has ever said that beer is masculine? That Cider is not masculine?  The wrong thinking has pervaded here because the already 70%+ of the beer drinking market that is male will be hard pressed (get it?!) to get past all the other gibberish we’ve been slowly force-fed to the end that men must like beer.

Interesting point: That apparently “A Boston Beer spokeswoman did not return a request for comment.” What exactly did they want Boston beer to comment on? Oh – how about this, from the author:

“She said that ‘while Angry Orchard in and of itself might feel masculine,’ the brand’s ‘design techniques,’ such as its ‘whimsical tree’ and color scheme, ‘lean a little bit away from the masculine side.’ “ [attributed to Rita Patel, director of new product development at MillerCoors]

This is the wrong thing for one brand to say about another – to assume they think they know what the entire consuming body thinks. No, Rita, don’t do it. In fact, I’d like to have a cider or beer with Rita and other powers that be at MillerCoors to learn exactly where they think they are coming from – cause me thinks it ain’t the consumer. (Rita – call me anytime here)

The merry-go-round goes round…and round…and round…to the same tired music with the same wrong-headed thinking on all accounts.

I look forward to the day the phone rings and someone with some impact from the largest and most influential breweries call and ask, “So – what does the consumer think?” of us. That’ll be a red (apple) letter day.

p.s. and who precisely is the common man??

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