American Craft Beer Week

What is Craft to you?

Actually the best definition or parameters to me are to make something that is well crafted. With a nod to my friend and colleague Marty Jones, paying attention to the care and creation of something is far more important than an end label. I hate labels and much prefer and endorse a wider lens.

Cheers!

Cheers!

When you put though forth – before the process begins – when you craft something with care, then I can support that. To simply label something if it fits with someones definition (wherever they chose to come up with it) isn’t holding any water for me. What if the product fitting the definition definers is really poor quality, what if it’s sexist or ageist or racist? Does that still allow it to fit. With a blanket label, yes it does.

That’s a bad deal to me and negates some of the authority of the self designated governing body.

Craft can be whatever you want it to be to you. It’s like art. And good taste. And delicious. We can only define those for ourselves.

Cheers to well crafted goods, products and services. I can live with that – so happy American Craft Beer Week, and whatever it is to you.

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American Craft Brewers like to Collaborate

Here’s an example of collaboration: Guest tap of a neighboring brewery during American Craft Beer Week (just finished May 16 – 22).

Larry (l) and Scott (r) salute ACBW with collaboration

Larry Chase, Standing Stone, and Scott Saulsbury, Southern Oregon Brewing, enjoy a good beer together. And not just during ACBW.

They are comrades, as are many brewers. This is a snapshot from this past Saturday during ACBW. Larry invited a few guest brewers to join them at SSBC and share their beer for the benefit of the SSBC guests and beer enthusiasts. Corey of Klamath Basin was another brewer Larry engaged.

See, when collaboration happens, then it’s better for the whole community. Collaboration = communication = common goals = fun = success.

Support your local brewery collaborations. Look for them off-sale (in stores) and on-site (on draught). There’s no more creative group of thinkers than American craft brewers.

Here’s another example of collaborating in the beer community.

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