CAMFA & American Craft Beer Week

CAMFA = an educational program developed by web which stands for Color, Aroma, Mouthfeel, Flavor and Alcohol.

American Craft Beer Week = celebration of the contributions of American craft brewers.

Declare your ACBW Beer Independence

Put the two together and VOILA!! It’s a winning combination. In honor of ACBW, as beer enthusiasts may call it, here’s a tongue in cheek new iteration of CAMFA, dedicated to ACBW.

  • C = Craft beer. While to some it may be a state of mind, there’s no doubt that well crafted beer of any sort is worthwhile tasting.
  • A = Assortment. With well over 1700 craft breweries in American and 600+ more on the way, the variety is incredible.
  • M = Moderation. Savoring the Flavor, as the BA promotes – as do we, is the key to truly enjoying your beer and the precious universal beverage breweries put into every batch.
  • F = Females. With under 30% of women currently partaking of beer AND with women making 80% of purchasing decisions across the buying board, now is absolutely the time to get them involved. They are the future of American Craft Beer.
  • A = Accessibility. With the majority of Americans within 10 miles of a brewery, there’s every reason to hop on your bike, scoot the skateboard and otherwise get your self to the local brewery with friends.

Supporting your local brewery goes well beyond you and them. It’s good for our country and the international community.

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Including Women in Your Marketing

How do you get more female market share into your beers? Be sure to include the words “women”, “females”, “woman” in your written words – online, offline, and in person.

Here’s an example that totally excludes women:

What about women skiing? This is a perfect example of a sexist saying and leaves out that 50.9% of the population that helps your business survive, make it or break it.

It’s never been appropriate to use catchy sayings that exclude, however intentional or humor oriented. You’re still being exclusive. And exclusivity will never gather more interest because being exclusive inherently leaves someone out of the conversation. On purpose.

Are you really interested in exclusion to the detriment of you business? Especially when you are hit in the face with the fact that 80% of purchases are made by women.

This company ad is doing a great job at alienating women. Is that what they wanted to do? Is this what you want to do – exclude women beer enthusiasm?

Then don’t use exclusive language. Think. Ask. Act in an educated fashion.

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What Women Want Series: Part 8 – Attention to Titles and Labels

Pay attention to titles, labels, and identifiers.

How you address female consumers matters

It’s important.  Women in focus groups all over America indicate they prefer no titles – no Mrs., no Ms., no Miss. Woman say to simply use their names.

If you don’t know their names or choose to mind your p’s and q’s and need to group them, call them ‘females’ and ‘women.’ ‘Ladies’ is okay, although it’s split input here – some are fine with it and some are not. What you don’t want to do with ‘ladies’ is have a ‘ladies night.’

Why not? Think sleazy ladies nights events of days gone by, bad bars in college that had ladies night. What did those nights have a lot of? Trolling men the women didn’t want hitting on them. If you’re going to do a women’s/females/ladies event, do it only of that one gender. The dynamic of a single gender event is remarkable in its own right, whether it be for only women or only men.

What matters is how the consumer wants to be addressed; not what you think is clever, what you’re comfortable with or what other people put on them. Those in the industry and those who are raving fans of using ‘girls’, ‘chicks’ or other slang aren’t pushing progress. Yes, it’s fine to call a female friend a girl in private. What you have to be aware and cognizant and thoughtful of is the perception of others and how they interpret the title you choose.

Women will give you a stamp of approval when you address them properly

If you choose Women or Females, you can be safely respectful and still be on target, not offending anyone. And that’s part of the import here.

Anyone in any industry needs to always keep in mind: they are not their consumer and therefore it does matter what you call your customers or fans, regardless of what you – the one in the industry – think. Let the jargon and personal feelings go, and ask and respect what women want.

While we’re at it, are women males? Then don’t call them ‘guys’ either. Yes, it’s casual mostly accepted slang. Just because we’re used to it doesn’t make it right. At one time in this country we had separate entrances for blacks and whites. That was accepted and still wasn’t right either.

And no, we’re not being over dramatic. Is pay equal for women and men in this country? No – and until you can connect the dots that it ALL matters, titles and labels and we address one another will make a difference. It’s up to you to decide which kind of difference you are going to make and the progress or stagnation you are going to foster.

Set the pace. Call women what they want to be called, with respect and do it all the time.

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It's "Women" & "Female", Not "Ladies"

One immediately recognizable constant in the work I do is that women tell me they do not like being called Ladies. It’s old fashioned (in a not so good

What not to do

What not to do

way), fuddy-duddy, feels like a cheezy bar is advertising to get men who’ll troll if they host a “ladies night”.

So don’t do it.

Use Women and/or Females. Not girls (underage, under 12, infantile, condescending), not broads (harsh, cheap), not babes (do I even have to say why??).

Women, Females is accurate – appropriate age connoted, respectful, universal, not insulting to anyone.

Simply relate it to the important females in your life – whether you’re a female or a male. Would you treat them with disrespect? If the answer is no, then turn it about when you advertise and market.

This is really important – pay attention.

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