Women Beer Writers: Calling For Names

Where the hell are all the female beer writers?

In a world rife with more than 50%+ female, we should be asking the same question. Then doing something about it.

Janet Fletcher = pro writer who penned Cheese & Beer (her yogurt book is yes another delicious example of her work.)

Janet Fletcher = pro writer who penned Cheese & Beer (her yogurt book is yes another delicious example of her work.)

In the New York Time Sunday Magazine issue on Women in Hollywood, the author writes:

“Fixing the gender problem in Hollywood is important for women like [Director Leigh] Janiak. But it’s also important for women and girls everywhere.’We are influencing culture, which is why it’s so dangerous, I think, not to have more women making movies,’…”

So today I want your help. I want to know which women you know who write about beer professionally. No, not bloggers or cut-and-pasters or journalistic wanna-bes; we’re looking for the real professional deal here – any length of pro [paid] writing is valid.

They also need to be referenced as experts cited for their efforts and work. The Smithsonian Magazine recently got an email from me to that end. There’s a big fat gaping hole that needs to be addressed at that publication: enormous lack female subjects and experts as well as covers and experts cited. And though it’s a different genre, we’re still all in it together. Every instance of non-equitable gender representation matters. I’ll be mildly shocked, by the way, if I even hear back from The Smithsonian on my comment and call to action.

At a minimum I spoke up. And you can guarantee I’ll keep speaking up. You need to as well.

Comment here to share who you know so we can get a better look. There’s a HUGE dearth of the female perspective – and we have to hold the publications accountable as such.

Then – after you do so – directly contact the beer publications to hire them. There’s no good excuse why there should be an imbalance of gender in writing. If you’re a female beer writer, assertively pursue the work available and create your own ideas to make it easier for publishers and editors to say yes. Ask the editors you work with who have a big picture of the landscape to help you improve; ask them for suggestions on education opportunities. You must still be a good writer before you focus on gender.

Get better at what you do, make it easy for them to say yes!

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